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Newport, Rhode Island

Cemetery Location Descriptions

 

 Click on the cemetery number for location, description and other information about each cemetery.

Contact information for currently operating cemeteries has been given where known.
All other cemeteries are assumed to be either privately  owned or the owner is unknown.

NT001

NT002

NT003

NT004

NT005

NT006 NT007

NT008

NT009

NT010

NT011

NT012

NT013 NT014

NT015

NT016

NT017

NT018

NT019

NT020 NT021

NT022

NT023

NT024

NT025

NT026

NT027 NT500

NT501

NT502

NT503

NT504

NT505

NT600 NT602

NT604

NT605

NT610


 
 

Return to the Cemetery Database Cemetery Location town list.
Return to the Rhode Island Cemetery Database Home Page.



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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT001     ISLAND CEMETERY                         NEWPORT RI



           Location: 20 ft north of WARNER ST at TEL pole # 8     



            10000 burials



            Owner: Island Cemetery Inc, Warner St., Newport, RI 02840 (401) 846-0432



            NOTE: The "History of Newport County, Rhode Island," ed. Richard M. Bayles, NY, 1888 contains the following         



            description of Island Cemetery:                                                                               



                The town of Newport, on the 18th of May, 1836, purchased a tract of land, which was the beginning of the  



            cemetery now known as the "Island Cemetery," on Warner street. Early the next year Mr. Henry Bull and William 



            W. Freeborn were appointed to lay out the new burial ground. In 1839 a certain portion was surveyed and laid  



            out into one hundred and thirty-six lots, each one rod square. These were offered for sale at moderate rates. 



            In 1844 the balance of the purchase was laid out, avenues made, trees and shrubbery set out, and a substantial



            fence built, the wall and the gateway costing $831.33. In 1848 a company was formed to whom the town conveyed 



            the grounds. The trustees of the "Island Cemetery Company" were authorized to take care of the property, to   



            grant deeds of lots unsold and to adopt the necessary means for raising funds as might be required for the    



            purposes of the new company. Several additions have been made to the original purchase, thus affording better 



            conveniences, and rendering this spot a fitting repository for the dead. Recently a fine freestone chapel has 



            been built by the Honorable August Belmont, near the lot owned by him, wherein rest the remains of Commodore  



            M.C. Perry. The grounds are tastefully laid out and contain many beautiful lots, where the hand of affection  



            has been lavish in its adornments, and loving hearts have reared elaborate and expensive monuments" (p. 543). 



                Many of the earlier inscriptions were recorded by Dr. Henry E. Turner, who was involved in an official    



            capacity (secretary of Willow Cemetery) with the cemetery. This manuscript is at the Newport Historical       



            Society; typed transcriptions of it, unfortunately made after it had significantly deteriorated, are there and



            at the Rhode Island Historical Society. Turner's records have been entered and are coded HET.                 



                From the mid-1980's through the early 1990's Alden G. Beaman published a selective record of              



            transcriptions in the Rhode Island Genealogical Register. He chose to record almost exclusively couples born  



            before 1850, thus creating an excellent reference for marriages, but leaving out single people and children.  



            Beaman noted platform stones, group monuments, hedges, and otherwise fenced plots. Individual stones are      



            mentioned only if the condition interferes with reading the inscription. His data has been entered and is     



            coded AGB.                                                                                                    



              In January 1996 John Sterling visited Virginia Sampson who will mark her 70th anniversary working at the    



            cemetery next year. When the Island Cemetery was incorporated in 1848, two cemeteries (New Burying Ground,    



            1840 and Willow Cemetery, 1852) were located on the grounds. Original lot deeds are in the safe. She says the 



            cemetery has records for 11,409 interments, many on cards made in the 1920's by a previous superintendent. As 



            of April 1996 we have 3,378 names from Island and another 165 from Willow for a total of 3,543 from this      



            cemetery. It will be noted that quite a few of the names predate the official founding of the cemetery,       



            perhaps moved by descendants to this more elegant burial ground or perhaps erected before the cemetery was    



            incorporated. 
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT002     ISLAND ANNEX CEMETERY                   NEWPORT RI



           Location: 20 ft north of VAN ZANDT AVE at TEL pole # 6     



            300 burials 



            Owner: Island Cemetery Inc, Warner St., Newport, RI 02840 (401) 846-0432



            NOTE: Although there are supposedly 300 burials, only two (NORTH husband and wife who died in the 1930's) met       



            Beaman's criterion of birth before 1850 and thus are entered in the database. This is the modern section. 
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT003     COMMON BURIAL GROUND                    NEWPORT RI



           Location: 20 ft east of FAREWELL ST



            7500 burials 



            500 ft x 500  ft in fair condition enclosed with a stone wall; sign in good condition



            NOTE: A land grant to Newport by Dr. James Clarke, 1640.                                                            



                Bayles' "History of Newport County," NY, 1888, describes it thus: "The "Common Ground," so called, is the 



            oldest public cemetery in Newport. It was laid out about 1665. It remains today in all its primitive          



            surroundings, and the quaint headstones of common slate, with their rude inscriptions, awaken a feeling of    



            veneration which surrounds this spot with no little degree of interest. Here may be seen the graves of many of



            the early governors of the colony, that of a signer of the Declaration of Independence, the graves of our     



            early merchants and clerical worthies. Many stones are dedicated the memory of old sea captains. The cemetery 



            contains twenty stones on which armorial ensigns are cut; all of these lie flat on the surface of the ground, 



            and of course have, like most of the early stones in this ground, suffered every sort of injury, even in a few



            cases, wanton mutilation. Among the stones on which family arms are cut may be mentioned the Cranstons,       



            Sanford, Bayley, Wanton, Thurston, Chaloner, Buckmaster, Freebody, Vernon, Ellery, Sears, Gardner and Ward.   



            One might almost write a history of Newport in this common ground, so full are the inscriptions on the stones  



            erected here" (pp. 542-543).                                                                                  



                The Common Burial Ground was described in a general way in a speech entitled "Newport Cemeteries" by the  



            Hon. Robert Stilman Franklin. This speech was published as a Special Bulletin of the Newport Historical       



            Society, No. Ten, Dec. 1913, in honor of Franklin, who had just died. The article has a number of interesting 



            if fuzzy photos.                                                                                              



                Of particular interest are the stones in the northern section for slaves and indentured servants. Most of 



            these are marked as Section 01, although those from CETA may be Sections 1, 2, or 3, grid blocks 16 through   



            23. Recording the inscriptions in our database, as in other forms of African-American research, is complicated



            by surname issues: too few and too many. Often we find first names only, either because the person may not    



            have used a surname, or because the parents had different surnames because they belonged to different owners  



            and thus the correct surname is not known. The surname usually that of the owner. Notes of ownership are more 



            common in the pre-Revolutionary period than notes on blood relationships; if both are present, the owner      



            relationship commonly precedes the blood relationship on the stone. See James Garman's article "'Faithful and 



            Loyal Servants': The Masking and Marking of Ethnicity in the Material Culture of Death" in "Volumes in        



            Historical Archaeology," So. Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, Univ. of S.C., 1992 for a      



            technical analysis of this part of the cemetery, including transcriptions in chronological order (entered as  



            JG). Richard Youngken's "African Americans in Newport 1700-1945" treats the community as a whole with several 



            interesting photos of stones.                                                                                 



                Various attempts to catalogue the stones have been made over the years. Henry Turner in the late 19th     



            century included sections in his general work on Newport cemeteries (ms at NHS, typed transcripts of it there 



            and at RIHS). These names have been entered and coded HET. In 1903 the Newport City Council passed a          



            resolution to make a map and index under the direction of the Committee on Burial Grounds, consisting of      



            George W. Ritchie, William S. Rogers, Joan E. Leddy, and William H. Lawton, City Engineer. The Map and Index  



            (both the original and a reproduction) are at Redwood Library, Newport. Under the direction of Edward W.      



            Connelly in the 1970's, volunteers including members of Naval War College History Club transcribed index cards



            at NHS, annotated the grid map, and noted changes since 1903. Brush clearing, resetting, and photography of   



            stones were carried out at the same time (see Edwin Connelly, "The First Progress Report to Beautify, Restore,



            Catalogue the Common Burying-Ground, Farewell Street" in "Newport History, #152, Fall, 1973, 46.4, pp.96-100).



            Some of this information has been entered as CETA or EWC.                                                     



                Another, published resource is Alden G. Beaman's "Births 1590-1930 from Newport Common Burial Ground      



            Inscriptions" in RI Vital Records, New Series, vol.II, 1985. This alphabetical list contains a useful grid    



            map, and all stones are keyed to the map; Beaman also offers brief descriptions of plots within the cemetery. 



            Although this material has not been completely entered in the database, his transcription of the slave/servant



            section (RIGR 8, #2) has been entered and is coded AGB. As of June 18, 1996 4,669 names have been entered in  



            the database.                                                                                                 



                The Common Burial Ground may be a historically and socially invaluable resource, but it has a history of  



            erratic maintenance. Currently (1997) efforts are once again underway to catalogue all stones.                
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT004     BRAMAN CEMETERY                         NEWPORT RI



           Location: 15 ft east of FAREWELL ST



            1000 burials            



            NOTE: Beaman notes: "This cemetery is also called Rhode Island Historical Cemetery Newport #4. It is located on     



            Fairwell (sic) Street opposite the Common Burial Ground. It is a fairly modern cemetery, and only husband and 



            wife pairs born through 1850 are recorded. It has three Jewish sections in which many of the inscriptions are 



            in Hebrew and were not recorded." It may not be completely distinguishable from the Common Burial Ground at  



            this point, as occasionally recorders place individuals in either. 
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT005     OLD CITY CEMETERY (NORTH CEME)          NEWPORT RI



           Location: 15 ft west of FAREWELL ST at TEL pole # 8     



            500 burials 



            NOTE: Alden Beaman notes: "This cemetery is also called City Cemetery and Rhode Island Historical Cemetery   



            Newport #5. It is located on Fairwell (sic) Street opposite the Common Burial Ground. It is a fairly modern           



            cemetery..." Beaman recorded only husband-wife pairs born through 1850. 
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT006     ST MARY'S CEMETERY                      NEWPORT RI



           Location: 15 ft north of WARNER ST at TEL pole # 12    



            500 burials 



            Owner: St. Mary's Cemetery, 80 Memorial Blvd, Newport RI 02840 (401) 846-4926



            NOTE: This church was built in the early 1850's when the congregation outgrew the previous Catholic church, St.     



            Joseph's on Barney St. Victorian transcribers and descriptive writers appear to have ignored the cemetery.    



            Robert Hayman's "Catholicism in Rhode Island" mentions the church in passing, gives further reference to the  



            history privately printed in 1902: "Golden Jubilee of the Church of the Holy Name of Mary, Our Lady of the    



            Isle, Newport, R.I., 1852-1902." The inscriptions were selectively transcribed by Alden G. Beaman (AGB) and   



            published in the "RI Genealogical Register," 8:343-352 and 9:81-86. As usual he copied only husband-wife pairs



            born before 1850, with the addition of some widows whose husbands are named. 
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT007     JOHN CLARKE BURIAL GROUND               NEWPORT RI



           Location: 15 ft west of DR. MARCUS WHEATLAND BLVD. at TEL pole # 12    



            14 burials 



            Owner: United Baptist Church, 30 Spring Street, Newport, RI 02840 (401) 847-3210



            NOTE: "History of Newport County, Rhode Island," New York, 1888, ed. Richard M. Bayles: "On West Broadway is a      



            little cemetery containing the graves of Dr. John Clarke, one of the founders of Newport and pastor of the    



            First Baptist church. He died in 1676. Here also rest the remains of Reverend John Callender and other pastors



            of this church. Calender died in 1748."                                                                       



                This cemetery is in beautiful condition: walled on one side, with an iron fence on a stone base, and      



            padlocked iron gate. The standard RI Historical Cemetery sign is not in evidence, but there is an elegant sign



            with the following inscription:                                                                               



                                            JOHN CLARKE CEMETERY                                                          



                             To the memory of Dr. John Clarke, 1609-1676                                                  



                                        Clergyman Physician Statesman                                                     



                Leader of the settlers who purchased Aquidneck Island from the Indians  on March 24 1638. He was the first



            pastor of the church now known as The Un. Baptist Church John Clarke Memorial, located at 30 Spring St. As    



            agent for the Rhode Island Colony in England for twelve years from 1651, John Clarke procured the Charter of  



            1663 from King Charles II, which secured "full liberty in religious concernments." A permanent trust created  



            in his will dated April 20 1696 continues to provide income "for the relief of the poor or the bringing up of 



            children unto learning."                                                                                      



                Inscriptions were transcribed by Alden Beaman (AGB) and published in "Rhode Island Genealogical Register."



            Although some older source (????) mentions 16 stones, he counts only 14.  
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT008     FRIENDS CEMETERY                        NEWPORT RI



           Location: 15 ft  TILDEN & FEKE STREETS at TEL pole # 5X    



            150 burials 



            NOTE: A refreshing open space in a very built-up neighborhood, the cemetery is surrounded by a chain link fence.  



            The sign is so badly rusted that it can hardly be read; it is propped up against the fence. Clearly many of the   



            stones have disappeared as there are wide grassy patches. Presumably many of the people noted in Quaker       



            records are actually buried here---but we may never know because the stones have gone or were, in the early   



            Quaker way, never inscribed. Some of the names in the database come from Alden Beaman's transcription (AGB),  



            some from the continuing efforts of Len Panaggio (LP).                                                        



                A note in Quaker records for Jacob Mott who died in 1779 at age 88 (perhaps in Newport, perhaps not) gives



            an interesting glimpse of the past of this cemetery. It says that he was buried in his own ground, "the       



            meeting house and yard [this cemetery] occupied by Hessians."   
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT009     CODDINGTON BURIAL GROUND                NEWPORT RI



           Location: 15 ft west of FAREWELL ST at TEL pole # 8     



            56 burials with 94    inscriptions from 1647 to   



            Owner: Island Cemetery, Inc., Warner St., Newport, RI 02840 (401) 846-0432  



            NOTE: Recorded 14 Aug 1869 by G.H. Richardson (GHR) "all the legible inscriptions in the Coddington Burying 



            Ground, CETA volunteers in the 1970's, and also by Alden G. Beaman (AGB) in the 1980's.                               



                "History of Newport County, Rhode Island," New York, 1888, ed. Richard M. Bayles, notes: "On Farewell      



            street, near the First Baptist church, is the Coddington ground. Here are the graves of Governors Henry Bull. 



            who died in 1693; Nicholas Easton, 1675; John Easton, 1705; and William Coddington, 1678---four of the        



            original settlers of Newport. In this ground are buried many of the first inhabitants."                       



                A nice photograph of this cemetery appears in "The Architectural Heritage of Newport, Rhode Island,"      



            showing the walls and relationship to adjoining houses. The photo is captioned "Cemetery of Governors."  
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT010     TRINITY CHURCH CEMETERY                 NEWPORT RI



           Location: 15 ft south of SPRING ST. at TEL pole # 14    



            300 burials with 224    inscriptions from 1704 to 1900



            180 ft x 100  ft in good condition enclosed with a metal fence; sign missing



            Owner: Trinity Church, Queen Anne Square, Newport, RI 02840 (401) 846-0660



            NOTE: "History of Newport County, Rhode Island," New York, 1888, ed. Richard M. Bayles: "The ancient burial   



            place connected with Trinity church, on Church street, is an object of much interest. Several of the early  



            pastors of the church lie buried here. Here may be found the ground of the French Admiral de Ternay, who died 



            in 1780, and of many others who fought in the war of the revolution. On eight stones are found the arms of five        



            families: Gidley, Wanton, Bell, Goulding, Gibbs, representing a few of the wealthy merchants of Newport in the



            last century."                                                                                                



               When Bayles wrote the description above, the cemetery had already been given a full chapter in George      



            Champlin Mason's "Reminiscences of Newport," 1884, with good, early information on the gravestones (GCM).     



            Mason provides many names that have since disappeared; his account is rich in biographical detail. The        



            inscriptions were recorded again about 1900 by Jonas Bergner (1859-1936) in a beautiful ms at Redwood Library 



            in Newport "Ye Grave Stones in Trinity Church Yard." This book contains complete transcriptions of the        



            inscriptions, very careful pen and ink drawings of armorial carvings, some light pencil sketches of stones,   



            and names of carvers when known. Although only the most cursory comparison has yet been made, names only from 



            Bergner are coded JB.                                                                                         



                CETA volunteers drew stones & inscriptions in the late 1970s on cards in the possession of Edward W.      



            Connelly, director of the project. These have been used to confirm or amplify inscriptions recorded summer of 



            1995 by John Sterling with help of passing tourists! These names are input with the code JES.                 



                For further information on those buried here, consult James N. Arnold's "Trinity Church Newport, Deaths   



            and Burials," 10:537-544. It is worth noting that only a small percentage of members of the church are        



            actually buried in this medium-sized lot. To illustrate this point, consider Ezra Stiles' record of some 188  



            deaths of Episcopalians during 1760 through 1764; of 39 remaining gravestones only four are here, most of the 



            others at the Common Burial Ground (NT003). 
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT011     GOV. BENEDICT ARNOLD GRAVEYARD          NEWPORT RI



           Location: 40 ft north of PELHAM ST at TEL pole # 7     



            71 burials with 57    inscriptions from 1677 to 1834



            60  ft x 60   ft in good condition enclosed with a metal fence; sign in good condition



            NOTE: Although this cemetery is extremely important from both the historical and artistic perspectives, it was      



            literally buried for many years and only saved by the most dedicated, backbreaking work. See Alice Brayton's  



            "The Burying Place of Governor Arnold," Newport, RI, 1960 for the story of its restoration and fine           



            photographs of the excellent carvings and inscriptions. Most stones have an individual photograph and         



            biographical sketch of the person for whom it was carved. The material has been entered in the database and is



            coded JHB. An undated, but surely late 19th century transcript by George Henry Richardson (GHR) has preserved 



            readings of many now lost stones in their original location. These are noted "GHR only, not found 1960."      



            Richardson's ms can be seen at Newport Historical Society. Those interested in even greater details of the    



            cemetery at the turn of the twentieth century should consult the "Report of J.N. Arnold, Commissioner to      



            inquire into the present condition of the Governor Benedict Arnold Burial Place, and the title thereto, made  



            to the General Assembly at its January Session, 1901," Providence, 1901. This pamphlet contains a wealth of   



            historical detail and three maps, as well as two different transcriptions: (1) two stones copied in 1858 by   



            Dr. Henry Jackson (HJ) and (2) seven stones copied by an anonymous friend of Arnold's (ANON).                 



                In addition to the original burials, there are graves moved into the cemetery in living memory. An        



            undocumented note in our database for MT020, the Weeden Lot formerly at Green End & Valley Rd., Middletown,   



            says that John Howard Benson, then owner of the Arnold graveyard and the Stevens shop, had the graves moved in



            1960. The note does not specify the number, but it likely was small, as Richardson recorded only two in the   



            Middletown cemetery in the late 19th century. 
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT012     CONGREGATIONAL CEMETERY                 NEWPORT RI



           Location: 20 ft west of SPRING ST at TEL pole # 27    



            2 burials with 2    inscriptions from 1803 to 1839



            NOTE: This cemetery contains the graves of two Congregational ministers, one of which (1839) was removed at a 



            so-far unknown date from an older cemetery attached to the First Congregational church on Mill St. The second,      



            a monument, commemorates a pastor of the 2nd Congregational church, who died in Hartford CT. in 1839 (Hon.      



            Robert Franklin, "Newport Cemeteries," Special Bulletin #10 of NHS, Dec. 1913, pp. 44-45).                    



                ????? Beaman has two others REV. JOHN HELYER and REV. NATHANIEL CLAP. These are in our database in NT011, 



            referencing Beaman and JHB. The Beaman could well be a mistake because NT012 is on same page as NT011. We need



            to check JHB to be sure!!!!!!                                                                                 



                Should we give the older Congregational cemetery on Mill St. a number ???????????????? 
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT013     TOURO CEMETERY                          NEWPORT RI



           Location: 15 ft  KAY & TOURO ST at TEL pole # 8     



            100 burials with 40    inscriptions from 1761 to 1866



            50  ft x 100  ft in excellent condition enclosed with granite posts and iron rails; sign ???



            Owner: Touro Synagogue, 40 Touro Street, Newport, RI 02840 (401) 847-4794



            NOTE: First Jewish cemetery in RI. The Hebrew congregation was formed in 1658 in Newport. George Champlin    



            Mason's "Reminiscences of Newport," Newport, 1884, states that "In the City Clerk's office there is a copy of a  



            deed, dated Feb. 28, 1677, of a lot of land bought by Mordecai Capanall and Moses Pacheckoe, for a burial place 



            for Jews, which lot was enlarged by later purchases" (p.69).                                                      



                The "History of Newport County," ed. Henry Bayles, NY, 1888, describes it in some detail: "This beautiful 



            spot is well known to the many thousands who visit Newport. It is situated on Kay and Touro streets,          



            surrounded by a granite wall and iron fence, with a plain square gateway, over which is cut in bold relief a  



            winged globe. This cemetery of the ancient Hebrew congregation was acquired in the year 1677. Here are buried 



            many of the early members of this congregation. The inscriptions on the stones are in Hebrew, Latin,          



            Portuguese, Spanish and English. When the Hebrew congregation was broken up, in consequence of the removal of  



            its members to other cities, the burial ground was suffered to fall into neglect and decay. In 1820 Mr.       



            Abraham Touro, then a resident of Boston, visited Newport and gave directions for the erection of a brick     



            wall, which for many years afforded ample protection to the cemetery. In 1842 his brother Judah Touro, a      



            resident of New Orleans, caused the grounds to be put in perfect order, and replaced the brick wall with the  



            present substantial fence. At his death he bequeathed a considerable sum in trust to the city of Newport for  



            the perpetual care of this cemetery. The trust is faithfully and well discharged" (p. 544). Henry Wadsworth   



            Longfellow mentions this beneficence in his poem "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport": "Gone are the living, but  



            the dead remain,/ And not neglected for a hand unseen,/ Scattering its bounty, like a summer rain,/ Still     



            keeps their graves and their remembrance green" (Putnams' Magazine, June 1854, p. 81).                        



                In his lecture later published as a special bulletin of the Newport Historical Society, the Hon. Robert   



            Franklin discusses this cemetery and quotes extensively from an address given before the society in 1885 by   



            Rev. A.P. Mendes. Mendes had pointed out that all inscriptions began or ended with the phrase "May his soul be



            bound in the bands of life," that the word "died" is never used, that the Hebrew inscription contains only the



            dates and age, whereas the English one can be lengthy and flowery. While ordinarily in Jewish cemeteries the  



            date of death is expressed in a chronogram formed on some verse of scripture, Mendes found only one example   



            here, that of Abraham Touro's stone. See the Hon. Robert Franklin, "Newport Cemeteries," Special Bulletin of  



            the Newport Historical Society, #10, pp.30-32.                                                                



                Touro Cemetery may long have been a landmark in Newport, but its multilingual inscriptions appear to have 



            daunted past transcribers. The 40 names entered into the database were collected by (1) the Rev. Abraham      



            Pereira Mendes (APM) in 1875 for his paper "The Jewish Cemetery" read before the Newport Historical Society   



            and (2) Morris A. Gutstein (MAG) for an appendix to his book "The Story of the Jews of Newport," NY, 1936,    



            pp.295-321. Gutstein's book is particularly valuable. He provides a map of the cemetery, discusses anomalies  



            in the burials and possibilities of graves having been moved or built upon. His numbering system has been used



            in our database.  
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT014     GOLDEN HILL CEMETERY                    NEWPORT RI



           Location: 15 ft  GOLDEN HILL ST at TEL pole # 5     



            200 burials with 150    inscriptions from 1670 to     



            60  ft x 35   ft in good condition enclosed with a metal fence; sign ???



            NOTE: Also called Clifton Graveyard after the first owner of the land, Thomas Clifton, who left it in his will   



            in 1675 to the Society of Friends. An index card at Newport Historical Society points out that some stones       



            predate the will. Many Quakers are buried here, but in general the stones are elaborately rather than severely



            carved. Many notable citizens of early Newport, including FREEBORN CLARKE, a daughter of Roger Williams, and  



            her second husband GOV. WALTER CLARKE rest here. The Governors Wanton are buried here. The Hon. Robert S.     



            Franklin asserted in his 1911/1912 speech "Newport Cemeteries" that the family vault of Gov. Joseph Wanton was



            built at the expense of Joseph & William Wanton in 1771. He quoted, possibly from a now missing inscription,  



            that bodies of the wife and son of Joseph Wanton, Sr. and the wife and children of Joseph Wanton, Jr. were    



            moved to the vault Oct. 18, 1771. Other bones of the Wanton family were dug up, some from the Common Ground,  



            some from Bristol. (See the reprint in SPECIAL BULLETIN of the Newport Historical Society, No. Ten, Newport,  



            RI, Dec. 1910). A 1996 cursory examination revealed only a raised mound with only two WANTON names. See also  



            "Three Hundred Years of the Governors of Rhode Island," pp. 135-137.                                          



                Beside the many historically interesting persons buried here, this cemetery is notable for an             



            exceptionally fine collection of gravestones concentrated in a small area. The Stevens family of stone carvers 



            is well represented; one also finds many Bull and Mumford stones. As of March 1996 the cemetery was clean,    



            neatly trimmed, with few broken or down stones, a tribute to recent efforts by neighbors and the Newport Parks



            Commission. In 1869 H.T. Tuckerman described a different picture: "Rank weeds have overgrown the pathless     



            little enclosure, over which the poor dwellers of the neighborhood spread their washed garments to bleach"    



            ("The Graves of Newport," Harpers' Magazine, Aug. 1869). A hundred years later in 1969 it was still described 



            as in poor condition.                                                                                         



                Numerous sources document burials in this lot, beginning with the Friends' Record published in Arnold     



            (QUAK) which provides many names for which no stones exist now and likely never did. George Henry Richardson  



            (GHR) transcribed the lot in 1873 (ms at Newport Historical Society). Benjamin F. Wilbour and Waldo C. Sprague



            (WS) recorded inscriptions in natural order in 1956 (ms at NEHGS in Boston). CETA volunteers in the mid-1970s 



            sketched gravestones in natural order. Alden G. Beaman (AGB) published his transcription of "all stones which 



            could be read" in his "Rhode Island Genealogical Register," vol. 11, 1988, pp. 309-314. Most recently John E. 



            Sterling (JES) read the gravestones in late 1997 for phase 2 of the RI Historic Cemetery Project.             
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT015     EASTON LOT                              NEWPORT RI



           Location: 350 ft west of ANNANDALE RD at TEL pole # 8X    



            29 burials 



            40  ft x 40   ft in good condition; sign in good condition



            NOTE: "History of Newport County, Rhode Island," New York, 1888, ed. Richard M. Bayles, mentions this lot as   



            being "in good order." Robert Franklin mentions it as "a small walled enclosure, originally part of the old  



            Easton farm, containing the graves of members of the Easton family" ("Newport Cemeteries," SPECIAL BULLETIN    



            of the Newport Historical Society, Newport, RI, 1913, p. 43). During the 1970's CETA volunteers copied the           



            inscriptions and made pen-and-ink drawings of the carvings (cards in possession of Ed Connelly; copies owned  



            by John Sterling, on loan to Cherry Bamberg).  Transcriptions by Alden Beaman published in "Rhode Island      



            Genealogical Register," vol. 10, entered as AGB.     
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT016     COGGESHALL CEMETERY                     NEWPORT RI



           Location: 15 ft east of COGGESHALL AVE at TEL pole # 14    



            50 burials with 39    inscriptions from 1647 to 1958



            80  ft x 80   ft in excellent condition enclosed with a stone wall; sign ???



            



            NOTE: "History of Newport County, Rhode Island," New York, 1888, ed. Richard M. Bayles: "On Coggeshall avenue  



            is a little burial ground of about one acre, enclosed by a handsome stone wall, with an iron gate in the    



            central front, over which is chiseled "COGGESHALL, 1854." The interior is kept in perfect order, the stones  



            free from stain. In the center is a granite obelisk bearing the following inscription: "To the memory of John           



            Coggeshall, First president of the Colony, died Nov. 27, 1647, Aet. 57." The original stone bearing the same  



            inscription is still preserved at the head of the grave." Transcribed by George H. Richardson (GHR) on 19 Aug.



            1869, by CETA volunteers in the 1970's, and Alden Beaman (AGB) in the 1980's.  
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT017     FORT ADAMS CEMETERY                     NEWPORT RI



           Location: 2000 ft west of OCEAN DR



            250 burials 



            150 ft x 150  ft in excellent condition; sign ???



            NOTE: Margaret Beaman's note with 8 transcriptions: "This is a military cemetery with the graves in    



            meticulously straight rows which are widely separated. It is in a field (park) near the Ocean (Narragansett 



            Bay)and fenced with a neat hedge. The older graves are nearer the Ocean. The last 2-4 rows furthest removed  



            from the Ocean are of persons who died in the 1930's and 1940's. Many of the stones give only a death date 



            with no birth date or age at death. In a few rows from the most recent graves are those who died in World War   



            I and the 1920's. Most persons in the military cemetery died young; it is probably for this reason that we 



            found no husband and wife both buried together in this cemetery." (1991) Her transcriptions are coded MB.                          



                In 1995 John Sterling transcribed all the stones and input the data under the code JES. 
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT018     COLLINS BURIAL GROUND                   NEWPORT RI



           Location: 25 ft north of CASTLE HILL AVE at TEL pole # 6     



            6 burials with 5    inscriptions from 1791 to 1817



            20  ft x 40   ft in good condition enclosed with a metal fence; sign in good condition



            NOTE: Small cemetery for members of the COLLINS family, including JOHN COLLINS, Governor of Rhode Island 



            1786-1790. A monument says the stones were restored and protected by Dr. John G. Warren of Boston and Andrew  



            Collins of Louisiana in 1854. Transcribed by G.H. Richardson (GHR) in the Victorian period and by John  



            Sterling JES)in 1992.   
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT019     ST. MARY'S OLD CATHOLIC CEM.            NEWPORT RI



            northwest of MT. VERNON & BARNEY ST.



            28 burials with 24    inscriptions from 1828 to 1853



            Owner: St. Mary's Cemetery, 80 Memorial Blvd, Newport RI 02840 (401) 846-4926



            NOTE: Although currently linked with St. Mary's Catholic church, this cemetery was originally set out for St.       



            Joseph's, the first Catholic church in Rhode Island, which was formed in 1828. Its stones commemorate early   



            Irish immigrants, most of them in the prime of life, giving their original town and county in Ireland. The    



            church grew to become St. Mary's, and the first building (a former schoolhouse) was sold. The "Newport        



            Mercury" for Feb. 27, 1864 says: "Workmen are at present busy in stripping off the boards and taking up the   



            floor, previous to its removal, of the old Catholic Church on Mt. Vernon St. It was sold at auction to Mr.    



            Michael Butler in Perry St., who intends using the boards in the erection of small tenements, a class of house



            now much needed" (index card at NHS).                                                                         



                The marble stones now lie flat, set in the turf, their inscriptions gradually dissolving. Bertram         



            Lippincott III published transcriptions and a brief history of the church in "Rhode Island Roots," Dec. 1990, 



            pp. 109-111).                                                                                                 
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT020     WILBUR LOT                              NEWPORT RI



             BLISS ROAD



            NOTE: Richard M. Bayles describes the "Wilbor burial place on Bliss road" as being "in good order" (History of      



            Newport County, Rhode Island, 1888). May not exist today.   
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT021                                             NEWPORT RI
            Cemetery Number NT021 is not used in the the database
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT022     SABBATARIAN CHURCH CEMETERY             NEWPORT RI            



            NOTE: The now-extinct Sabbatarian Church in Newport flourished between Dec. 23, 1671 and 1836, with its greatest    



            period of membership and prosperity before the Revolution. See Arnold, 7:623-634 and 11: 297-307 for records. 



            Church building now belongs to the Newport Historical Society. Only 1 burial, that of Elder William Bliss, is 



            supposed to be from the cemetery; the stone now leans against a wall at NHS. 8 other members, including a     



            pastor and a deacon, are buried at the Common Burial Ground, one is at the Island Cemetery. Unclear whether   



            the church actually had its own cemetery.  
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT023     MARLBORO ST TOMB                        NEWPORT RI



             FOOT OF MARLBORO ST



            NOTE: Governor Jeremiah Clarke was buried in a tomb at the foot of Marlboro St. This cemetery no longer exists.  
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT024     SMALL POX - COASTER'S HARBOR            NEWPORT RI



           Location: 100 ft southwest of COASTER'S HARBOR ISLAND - HOPKINS AVE



            50 burials with 21    inscriptions from 1758 to 1802



            15  ft x 15   ft in fair condition no enclosure; sign not installed yet



            NOTE: Information on missing stones is from G.H. Richardson transcript of 1870. Coaster's Harbor is where the 



            Naval War College is located. Transcribed and entered by John Sterling (JES). 
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT025     G. E. MORAVIAN CHURCH LOT               NEWPORT RI



             CHURCH & HIGH STS.



            NOTE: This branch of the Moravian or United Brethren sect was founded in Newport in 1749, records begin Nov. of     



            1758. A house of worship was built in 1767-1768 on the site of the present Kay Chapel (built in 1869). Henry  



            Turner notes that Mary Malling (1712-1772) gave the lot from which her remains were removed; Arnold cites the 



            deed from Mary Mallens to Society of United Brethren in Bk. 16, Land Evidence, p.53 (Arnold, 7:610). Arnold's 



            transcription of the church records (ibid.) gives names of 84 members who died between late Nov. 1758 and Mar.



            1833. It is not known whether all of these were originally buried in the Moravian lot, but certainly some     



            were.         Tuckerman mentions this former cemetery in his article "The Graves of Newport" in Harpers'      



            Magazine, Aug. 1869: "Thus, in the Schoolhouse Yard, on Church Street, two or three upright grave-stones      



            hidden amidst bushes and weeds mark the site of the Moravian church, since converted into an Episcopal        



            chapel--the sect having died out in the place" (p. 373). The "Newport Mercury" for Nov. 11, 1882 has an       



            article "THE MORAVIAN CHURCH-The Disposition of the Remains from the Old Burying Ground." On information      



            received from John H. Greene, the writer states that at the time the property was sold, the remains were      



            removed by James A. Greene and Samuel Engs to the Common Burial Ground. In the family lot of John and Samuel  



            I. Greene a white marble monument commemorated Richard, Thomas, and Mary Hayward, as well as Mary Malling; it 



            says that the remains were moved in July 1867.                                                                



                 Of the 84 names we have records of 24 stones in our database, all but 1 in the Common Burial Ground. The 



            other is in the Willow section of the Island cemetery.  
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT026     GARDE LOT                               NEWPORT RI



             [REMOVED TO COMMON BURIAL GROUND, NT003]



            2 burials with 2    inscriptions from 1660 to 1665



            NOTE: Writing of the Common Burial Ground, the Hon. Robert Franklin says: "Among the oldest stones in this 



            cemetery are those placed over the tombs of John Garde and his wife. They were originally buried on their 



            estate on the west side of Thames street, near what is now known as Champlin's wharf, but some time before    



            the year 1800 they were removed to the common burial ground" ("Newport Cemeteries," Special Bulletin of the         



            Newport Historical Society, #10, Newport, 1913, p.7). It's not clear whether any other people were buried 



            there, and if so, whether their graves were moved or ever transcribed. The stones still exist at the       



            Common Burial Ground, although Mrs. Garde's appears to have been repaired or recast.      
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT027     GOV. CALEB CARR GROUND                  NEWPORT RI



             MILL ST. [REMOVED TO JAMESTOWN]



            NOTE: Was located on Mill Street west of the Coddington School.  Removed to Jamestown in 1900.  Now   



            registered as JM001.                                                                                                        



            Mentioned in G.H. Richardson's "Scrapbook," Book 974, p. 24, print of mf at NHS. Richardson says the bodies   



            were removed to Jamestown by a descendant (Mrs. John Foster Carr) Sept. 8, 1900. The names he lists are now in



            JM001: GOV. CALEB CARR (d. 1695) and his wife MERCY (VAUGHN) CARR (d. 1675); MARY CARR (d. 1789) and her      



            husband CAPT. JOHN CARR; JOHN CARR, JR. (d. 1784) and CALEB ARNOLD CARR (d. 1793), sons of Capt. John; JOHN   



            CARR (d. 1772); WAIT CARR (d. 1772); CALEB CARR (d. 1783) and his wife ELIZABETH CARR (d. 1805).  
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT500     WILLOW CEMETERY                         NEWPORT RI



             FAREWELL ST. (ISLAND CEMETERY)



            Owner: Island Cemetery Inc, Warner St., Newport, RI 02840 (401) 846-0432



            NOTE: When Island Cemetery was incorporated in 1848, there were two cemeteries situated on the grounds: the    



            "New Burying Ground" and Willow Cemetery. The original lot deed for Willow Cemetery, signed by Henry E. 



            Turner, is dated 2 Jan. 1852; it is in the safe at Island Cemetery. Four file drawers there contain cards of  



            lot maps and names, made by a previous superintendent in the 1920's.                                                       



                Although Dr. Turner lists transcriptions of stones in Willow Cemetery separately in his collection, other 



            transcribers do not make a distinction, and Willow no longer has an identity as a separate cemetery.  
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT501     WOOD BURYING PLACE                      NEWPORT RI



             FREEBODY & BROAD ST (NOW BROADWAY)



            NOTE: Recorded by G H Richardson 1870. As Freebody and Broadway do not currently intersect, the exact   



            location of this cemetery is unknown.                 
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT502     DYRE FAMILY BURIAL GROUND               NEWPORT RI



             MAITLANDS - DYRE FARM



            NOTE: Recorded by G H Richardson 1870. He gives the exact location as "Dyre's Farm, late Robert L. Maitlands"   



            (GH Richardson Scrapbook 974, Vol. A, copy at NHS). Staff at NHS believe this property was located roughly  



            where the Naval Hospital was built. Richardson describes the moving of the graves as a consequence of   



            development: "These stones were removed to the ____ Wm. lot in Old Ground [Common Burial Ground?] Oct. 25,  



            1889, the farm then being cut up into house lots and the burial ground left in the street."  
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT503     BLISS-PIERCE LOT                        NEWPORT RI



             CORNER BROAD ST (NOW BROADWAY) & EVERETT ST.



            NOTE: Recorded by G H Richardson in his Scrapbook 974, vol. A, copy at Newport Historical Society. On his first     



            visit (say 1870) he gave the location as "rear of Felix Peckham's, at corner of Everett St. at Broadway. He   



            revisited the lot 27 May 1918 and gave the location as "at rear of Loresta." This area is completely covered  



            with houses today.       
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT504     DIXON BURIAL PLACE                      NEWPORT RI



             BELLEVUE AVE., MOVED TO ISLAND CEMETERY



            NOTE: Recorded by G H Richardson 19 Aug 1869. Despite the name of the cemetery, the surviving inscriptions all  



            are for TAYLOR family members (with the exception of PATIENCE PECKHAM), mostly buried between 1757 and 1766. 



            This lot appears to have been moved to Island Cemetery (NT001) as Turner places stones which Richardson placed    



            here in Island instead (for example, SARAH (TAYLOR) WILLIAMS, BENJAMIN TAYLOR, and PATIENCE PECKHAM).  The    



            "History of Newport County" does not mention it in 1888, so presumably the graves were moved between          



            Richardson's visit in 1869 and that date.   
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT505     GRAVES POINT LOT                        NEWPORT RI



             OCEAN DRIVE



            2 burials with 1    inscriptions from 1772 to 1772



            NOTE: Two stones, one with an inscription, recorded by G.H. Richardson in his scrapbook (Book 794, p. 46, print  



            of microfilm at NHS). H.T. Tuckerman in his article "The Graves at Newport" (Harpers' Magazine, Aug. 1869, p.    



            372) refers to the graves of shipwrecked sailors near Brenton reef. Richardson's transcription is in fact for 



            a 15 year-old who was drowned, whether from a ship or not is not stated. The 1888 edition of G.M. Hopkins'    



            "City Atlas of Newport, Rhode Island," printed in Philadelphia, shows two rectangles marked "graves 1772" on  



            Graves Point between Ocean Avenue (now Ocean Drive) and the sea. Richardson's sketch shows them on the        



            other---the land---side of the road. As they have long since been washed away, the matter is academic.        
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT600     NEWPORT LOCATION UNKNOWN                NEWPORT RI



             FROM QUAKER DEATH RECORDS



            NOTE: Not a cemetery. These names come from Quaker death records rather than from inscriptions on stones; they  



            are in the database as a temporary aid to researchers. Presumably individuals are buried in several cemeteries,   



            many of these are marked by plain fieldstones according to Quaker tradition and some may have never had       



            stones. Where stones have been identified, names have been placed in the appropriate cemetery. Records were   



            transcribed by John Sterling.   
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT602     JOHN TAYLOR'S FARM                      NEWPORT RI



             UNKNOWN



            1 burials 



            NOTE: One known burial, that of ALICE LEE, 2nd, from Quaker records. Significantly she died during the period 



            during which the Hessians were occupying the Quaker meeting house and burial ground, and had to be buried in a       



            private rather than communal site. Town not known to be Newport with certainty.   
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT604     JACOB MOTT'S BURIAL GROUND              NEWPORT RI



             UNKNOWN



            NOTE: He was buried "in his own ground" in 1778 because the Quaker meeting house and yard were occupied by 



            Hessians. Unknown whether there were any other burials, unlikely that any stone exists today. Town might      



            have been Portsmouth where many MOTTs lived.  
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT605     ROBERT TAYLER'S ORCHARD                 NEWPORT RI



             UNKNOWN



            1 burials 



            NOTE: Single burial (ROBERT TAYLER, 1653-1707) from Quaker records. Possibly in Newport. 
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         NEWPORT HISTORICAL CEMETERY #: NT610     UNKNOWN LOCATION - NEWPORT              NEWPORT RI
            NOTE: From RIHS MSS V 15 pg 413. Only one name left here, other located at CBG. What is this source??????????? 
 
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